December142012
5minutesprmediter:

Le pouvoir de la gratitude…
En Orient, on raconte cette histoire : un méchant homme déposa une lourde pierre au faîte d’un palmier, ce qui obligea l’arbre à plonger ses racines plus profondément dans la terre. Mais quand l’homme revint, une année s’étant écroulée, le palmier dominait tous ses congénères.
Il en va de même avec la gratitude. Elle transforme en défi ce que d’autres me font subir, et elle m’aide à grandir, y compris dans les périodes douloureuses de ma vie, à ancrer plus profondément mes racines. Elle me donne la force de chercher appui, non pas sur des éloges ou des reproches que je pourrais recevoir, mais, en dernière instance, sur Dieu. »
Extraits du livre «  Le petit livre de la vie réussie »
D’Anselm Grün
source : http://philosophie-poeme.kazeo.com
vbshalom:


“Do you really want to be happy ?
 You can begin by being appreciative of who you are
 and what you’ve got.”
—The Tao of Pooh

5minutesprmediter:

Le pouvoir de la gratitude…

En Orient, on raconte cette histoire : un méchant homme déposa une lourde pierre au faîte d’un palmier, ce qui obligea l’arbre à plonger ses racines plus profondément dans la terre. Mais quand l’homme revint, une année s’étant écroulée, le palmier dominait tous ses congénères.

Il en va de même avec la gratitude. Elle transforme en défi ce que d’autres me font subir, et elle m’aide à grandir, y compris dans les périodes douloureuses de ma vie, à ancrer plus profondément mes racines. Elle me donne la force de chercher appui, non pas sur des éloges ou des reproches que je pourrais recevoir, mais, en dernière instance, sur Dieu. »

Extraits du livre «  Le petit livre de la vie réussie »

D’Anselm Grün

source : http://philosophie-poeme.kazeo.com

vbshalom:

Do you really want to be happy ?

You can begin by being appreciative of who you are

and what you’ve got.

—The Tao of Pooh

October252012
“Quand on s’éveille enfin à la claire compréhensionEt que l’on sent qu’il n’y a aucune frontièreQu’il n’y en a jamais euOn se rend compte qu’on est toutLes montagnes, les rivièresL’herbe, les arbres, le soleil, la lune, les étoilesEt l’univers enfinNe sont autres que nous-mêmes.Rien ne nous distingueRien ne nous sépare les uns des autresL’aliènation, la peur, la jalousie, la haine,Sont évanouies.On sait en pleine lumièreQue rien n’existe en dehors de soiQue par conséquent rien n’est à craindre.Etre consient de cet étatEngendre la compassion.Les gens et les choses ne sont plus séparées de nousMais sont au contraireComme notre propre corps.”- Genpo Sensei, moine zen.

Quand on s’éveille enfin à la claire compréhension
Et que l’on sent qu’il n’y a aucune frontière
Qu’il n’y en a jamais eu
On se rend compte qu’on est tout
Les montagnes, les rivières
L’herbe, les arbres, le soleil, la lune, les étoiles
Et l’univers enfin
Ne sont autres que nous-mêmes.
Rien ne nous distingue
Rien ne nous sépare les uns des autres
L’aliènation, la peur, la jalousie, la haine,
Sont évanouies.
On sait en pleine lumière
Que rien n’existe en dehors de soi
Que par conséquent rien n’est à craindre.
Etre consient de cet état
Engendre la compassion.
Les gens et les choses ne sont plus séparées de nous
Mais sont au contraire
Comme notre propre corps.”
- Genpo Sensei, moine zen.

(Source: ozone-babyy, via vbshalom)

October102012
“The sun never says to the earth : ‘You owe me.’
Look what happens with a love like that.
It lights up the whole sky.”
-  Hafiz.


Sufi dancer

“The sun never says to the earth : ‘You owe me.’

Look what happens with a love like that.

It lights up the whole sky.”

-  Hafiz.

Sufi dancer

(Source: insomniacnightswimmer, via vbshalom)

hafiz 

August302012
« Il n’est jamais trop tard pour devenir ce que l’on aurait pu être. »George ELIOT
« Il n’est jamais trop tard pour devenir ce que l’on aurait pu être. »

George ELIOT

(Source: vbshalom)

July302012
unconditionedconsciousness:

Let silence take you to the core of Life
~ Rumi ♥

unconditionedconsciousness:

Let silence take you to the core of Life

~ Rumi ♥

(via vbshalom)

April272012
March92012
“On ne peut rien apprendre aux gens. On peut seulement les aider à découvrir qu’ils possèdent déjà en eux tout ce qui est à apprendre.”
- Galilée

photo : Goodbye today [Explore] by nextBlessing

On ne peut rien apprendre aux gens. On peut seulement les aider à découvrir qu’ils possèdent déjà en eux tout ce qui est à apprendre.”

- Galilée

photo : Goodbye today [Explore] by nextBlessing

(Source: vbshalom)

February132012
"You have no need to travel anywhere - journey within yourself. Enter a mine of rubies and bathe in the splendor of your own light.” 

- Rumi

photo : scrappartygal

"You have no need to travel anywhere - journey within yourself. Enter a mine of rubies and bathe in the splendor of your own light.” 

- Rumi

photo : scrappartygal

October292011

beingblog:

Compassion Is a Skill to Be Developed Through Practice

by Krista Tippett, host

Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche makes a point, Childrens and Young People's Audience and Blessing, Matthieu Ricard, students, Longhouse, Vancouver BC, Lotus Speech CanadaMatthieu Ricard looks on as Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche makes a point to children in Vancouver, Canada. (photo: Linda Lane/Flickr, cc by-nc-sa 2.0)

The title we’ve given this week’s show, “The ‘Happiest’ Man in the World,” is slightly tongue-in-cheek. It appeared in a British newspaper after the publication of scientific study results on Matthieu Ricard’s brain. He dismisses this label and has issued many good-natured disclaimers. We’ve revived it here, however, because of the lovely way in which Matthieu Ricard fills that phrase with a whole new range of savvy, satisfying meaning.

I certainly found myself identifying with Ricard’s descriptions, in his own writing, of his youthful, worldly-wise dismissal of “happiness” as a goal. I too was dismissive, well into adulthood, of the very word “happiness” and its overwhelming associations with the dream-come-true state that ends movies, for example, or the happiness as “having it all” American way.

But Matthieu Ricard puts words to what I’ve learned as I’ve grown older. He accomplishes that as much with his ideas as with his presence. He is a slightly incongruous yet wholly comfortable Frenchman SoundSeen: Unedited Interview with Ricardswathed in the lavish gold and red of Tibetan monastic robes, with practical shoes beneath. He is at once sophisticated and mischievous, intellectual and childlike — something, that is, like his teacher the Dalai Lama. It was a privilege to experience them both at a series of gatherings in Vancouver, British Columbia, where they were in conversation with Nobel laureates, scientists, social activists, and educators. We converted a tenth-floor suite at the Shangri-La Hotel, aptly named and somewhat surreal, into a production suite for this interview, which you can view as well as hear on our site.

I am fascinated by the way in which science is interwoven with Matthieu Ricard’s life story as well as his current work with the Dalai Lama and his very definition of the spiritual quest. He is one of those so-called “Olympic meditators” — people who have meditated tens of thousands of hours and whose brains have been studied and yielded important new insights into something called neuroplasticity — the human brain’s capacity to alter across the life span. This is a fairly recent and fairly dramatic — and not uncontroversial — discovery that came about as a result of research involving the Mind and Life Institute — a fascinating dialogue with scientists from many disciplines that the Dalai Lama has been hosting for many years.

Matthieu Ricard actually began his life as a molecular biologist, working with a Nobel Prize-winning biologist at the prestigious Pasteur Institute in Paris. His decision to leave France for a Buddhist monastic path greatly perplexed his father, Jean-François Revel, a philosopher who was a pillar of French intellectual life. But as he describes in a literary dialogue with his father that was published as The Monk and the Philosopher, Tibetan Buddhism was less of a departure in his mind than in his father’s.

The Impressionable Faces of Buddhist SilenceHe had become drawn to the spiritual masters, who would later become his teachers and eventually his peers, leading lives of integrity. And there was a very personal, full-circle integrity in his love of the natural world that had manifest itself in part in biological research — and in his appreciation for Buddhist spirituality as a life shaped by what he describes as “contemplative science.” I am utterly fascinated by the echoes between science and spirituality that Matthieu Ricard has continued to pursue and that we discuss together in this show.

Will neuroscience one day be able to not merely describe the movement of neurons and brain chemistry but add its own vocabulary to the meaning and nature of human consciousness, as related to or distinct from the brain? And how can we not be fascinated by the evocative echoes between the way quantum physicists have come to describe energy and matter and the way Buddhist philosophy has always described the interconnectedness and impermanence of human experience and all of life? Our understanding of the intersection of mind, life, body, and however you want to define the human spirit continues to unfold and develop, and is one of the most intriguing frontiers of this century.

(via gardenofthefareast)

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October242011

The Japanese master Nan-in gave audience
to a professor of philosophy.
Serving tea, Nan-in filled his visitor’s cup,
and kept pouring.

The professor watched the overflow
until he could restrain himself no longer:
“Stop!
The cup is overfull, no more will go in.”

Nan-in said,
“Like this cup,
you are full of your own opinions and
speculations.
How can I show you Zen
unless you first empty your cup?”

Tao Te Ching 

(Source: caelums)

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